Massage Therapy,Pain Relief,Techniques

Petrissage: Understanding Basic Techniques

PETRISSAGE ˌpetriˈsäZH

Translates to kneading

-French word (petris): meaning to mash or to knead

Petrissage is the rhythmic lifting, squeezing and releasing tissue.  It works parallel to the muscle fibers.  Through this application, metabolic waste

Wringing the hamstrings with hands moving in different directions on the leg.

is squeezed out of the tissues and fresh oxygenated blood is drawn into the muscles and enhances the healing process.  It is additionally effective when followed by effleurage.  This further moves out any waste, and prevents bruising of the skin and tissues.

 

 

 

Why move out waste in the tissues

Waste in the tissues is created by by-product our body cannot use from the foods we each and from foreign material we happened to breath in.  Usually, it is pushed out by healthy foods we each, clean water we drink and vigorous movement we do (i.e. exercise and staying active).  In today’s

Squeezing the section of muscle together on the back area.

world, toxins in the air and food have increased in comparison to what our ancestors experienced.  We more less, and eat not so great foods that are ideal for our body.  Over a short period of time, toxins in the body builds up quickly.  When they do not have the encouragement to move out (like with drinking ample amount of clean water, clean food and exercise) it makes its presence know.  Much of soreness and stuffiness a person can experience comes from buildup toxins.

 

Petrissage becomes the hero of the day.  Image being a rag with excessive liquid that leaves you feeling heavy and someone comes along and wrings out that liquid and frees you from what was slowing you down.  That is what this technique will do.

Benefits of Petrissage

Increase blood flow

Work out waste in the tissues

Relieve fatigue

Improve cellular nutrition

Lengthens and relaxes muscles

Reduce soreness and stiffness

Stimulates nervous system

Breaks up and soften fascia adhesion

 


References: Rattray, Fiona and Linda Ludwig. 2000. Clinical Massage Therapy:  Understanding, Assessing and Treating over 70 Conditions. Ontario, Canada: Talus Incorporated.

Copyright: domenicogelermo / 123RF Stock Photo

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